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Tubbs named president elect of American Association of Clinical Anatomists

December 03, 2021 5:00 PM
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Carolyn Scofield cscofiel@tulane.edu

Shane Tubbs, PhD, is a Neurosurgery Professor and Structural & Cellular Biology Professor at Tulane University School of Medicine. (Photo by Bakhtier Rizaev)

 

His discoveries in human anatomy have been used by surgeons around the world, and now Shane Tubbs, PhD, is helping lead a premiere organization for anatomists. Tubbs, Neurosurgery Professor and Structural & Cellular Biology Professor at Tulane University School of Medicine, has been named president elect of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA). The AACA was founded in 1983 to support, promote and advance anatomically and clinically-based scholarship in research, teaching and curricular matters within the health science professions.

 

Tubbs’ research interests are centered around what his lab has termed “reverse translational anatomy research,” where clinical/surgical problems are identified and addressed with anatomical studies. This investigative paradigm has resulted in more than 1,700 peer reviewed publications.

 

A 20-year member of the AACA, Tubbs considers this to be his most important professional affiliation.

 

“The Association promotes the application of anatomical principles to the solution of clinical problems and/or the application of clinical observations to expand anatomical knowledge. This bridge between anatomy and physicians and other health care providers is important for improving patient care.”

 

Tubbs says this is a critical time for anatomists, as the discipline has been unfortunately marginalized in many modern medical curricula. This is due to the explosion of new fields relevant to medicine - e.g., molecular biology – such that the time devoted to the anatomical sciences has necessarily been decreased.

 

Tubbs plans to help the group grow by adding new members and working with anatomists around the world to advance the AACA.

 

 “As the number of anatomists and especially, clinical anatomists, has dwindled over the years, it is important that this group of professionals unite and promote the relevance of research and education in the field of anatomy.”